Assessment

At-Risk Youth

Growth

Learning Standards

Opportunity Youth

Proficiency

School Climate

School Culture

Social – Emotional Learning

Subgroups

We want to be your go-to source for anything related to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Check out our new education vocabulary.

Click on the terms on the left to learn their definition.

Assessment

1: Describes a variety of methods and tools that educators use to measure and document what students know and are able to do. Assessments include questions from a textbook, assignments developed by teachers, and standardized tests administered by the state. Different types of assessment have different uses.

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At-Risk Youth

1: Youth that have a higher probability of failing academically or dropping out of school.

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EXAMPLE

Youth can be considered to be at-risk for poor life outcomes for a number of reasons:

· Homelessness, or being precariously housed or transient
· Emotional, physical or sexual abuse
· Living in neglectful or very stressful home/family environments
· Lack of emotional supports and caring adults
· Their own or family member’s problematic use of alcohol and/or drugs
· Their own or a family member’s mental illness
· Their own or a family member’s interactions with the criminal justice system
· Experiencing bullying or harassment in school or the community
· Experiencing community-based violence and trauma
· Living in under-resourced or asset-poor communities
· Experiencing racism, sexism, classism, homophobia or other devaluing and discriminatory attitudes about their personhood

Growth

1: A measure of an individual student’s academic progress towards mastery of skills at grade level, as measured by the change in a student’s performance between two moments in time.

a. It is most commonly measured by the difference in a student’s assessments scores.

Synonyms: Individual Student Academic Growth or “student growth

2: A standard of measurement, or metric, that is used to measure school performance overall.

3: A mathematical calculation of how well a school is doing overall at improving individual student growth.

a. There are many approaches to calculating this measure. The Illinois State Board of Education has not yet decided on which mathematical calculation to use.

Synonyms: School Growth

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Learning Standards

1: Learning standards outline what students should know and be able to do at the end of each grade level. They provide the basis for assessments, but do not provide direction on how to teach.

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Opportunity Youth

1: The group of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither enrolled in school nor in the workforce.

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EXAMPLE

Youth are considered to be opportunity youth in need of connection to supports, skills training and opportunity if they match any of the following situations:

· Did not complete high school and did not receive their high school diploma
· Received a high school diploma but have no further plans for education or work
· Received a high school diploma or college degree, but cannot find or obtain work
· Currently working, but are under-utilized, under-employed or in a job with limited growth potential

Proficiency

1: Is a learning benchmark intended to tell us whether a student has mastered a skill necessary for their grade level. A student is proficient if they are mastering the learning standards for their grade level. This is NOT a term used to describe student academic progress toward mastering a skill.

a. Measuring proficiency is often done by the state’s standardized assessment or test. Measuring progress towards a skill is what is commonly referred to as growth. (See growth)

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EXAMPLE

Proficiency tells us whether Kindergartener Jane Doe mastered the academic skill of counting to 100 using tens and ones.
Proficiency does not tell us that Kindergartener Jane Doe has mastered 60% of the learning necessary to be able count to 100 in tens and ones. Also it does not consider whether the students were proficient at the skill before they entered the classroom.

DID YOU KNOW?

Measuring proficiency is often done by the state’s standardized assessment or test. Measuring proficiency is just measuring whether or not a student has mastered the skill. Proficiency neither measure progress towards a skill or mastery beyond. Measuring progress towards a skill is what is commonly referred to as growth. (See growth)

Under No Child Left Behind, Illinois judged schools by the percent of students meeting proficiency benchmark in a grade, school, or district. Not their progress toward the skill.

School Climate

1: School Climate is reflective of the culture, embodying the mood, feeling, and morale within classrooms and the overall building.

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School Culture

1: School Culture is the shared set of long-standing values, norms, and beliefs that create the foundation for practices, behaviors, and relationships within a school.

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Social – Emotional Learning

1: The process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.

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Subgroups

1: ESSA requires that states create a unique way to support traditionally underserved demographic populations, or subgroups. In addition to the other accountability metrics, summative school ratings are dependent on subgroup performance.

a. The state has identified the following student demographic populations as subgroups: Economically disadvantaged students, Children with disabilities, English learners, Former English learners, Students formerly with a disability, and Students from each racial and ethnic group

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EXAMPLE

Each of the subgroups are comprised of group categories that must be used for accountability purposes. The categories below are required for accountability purposes, but states/districts can add additional categories for data reporting purposes. Additional subgroups tracked for data reporting (not accountability purposes) are homeless students, students with a parent in the military, and students in foster care.

· Race/Ethnicity – Students are categorized based on the following races and ethnicities: (1) African American or Black, (2) American Indian or Alaska Native, (3) Asian or Pacific Islander, (4) Hispanic, and (5) White, (6) Two or More Races.
· Economic Disadvantage – Any student eligible for free or reduced-price lunch under the National School Lunch program is reported in the “students with economic disadvantages” subgroup.
· Disability – Any student with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is reported in the “students with disabilities” subgroup.
· Students with Limited English Proficiency – Any student classified by the school as “limited English proficient” based on English-language tests and other assessments are reported in the “students with limited English proficiency” subgroup.